Jan
09

ARMED WITH U.S. EDUCATION, MANY LEADERS TAKE ON WORLD

Washington TImes

When U.S. officials were trying to broker a deal to end the bloody 20-year civil war between Sudan South Sudan in 2005, they had an in with the elusive guerrilla fighter leading the south’s shadowy rebel forces.

Before John Garang took up arms at the helm of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army, he spent four years at Iowa’s Grinnell College earning doctorate from Iowa State University in agricultural economics.

The portrait of the Dinka tribesman universities, a source of “soft power” that has boosted the country’s interests in often surprising ways.

Long before Mohamed Morsi rose through the ranks of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood to win the country’s post-revolution presidential election, he was a Trojan at the University of Southern California earning a doctorate in engineering from the Los Angeles school.

Other high-profile international figures, including Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili, King Abdullah of Jordan, former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan ascending to power.

The State Department lists nearly 300 world leaders, current its culture.

“We have been the most open to students from other countries. That’s why we continue to be the leading destination country, ing of the United States.”

Beyond the Ivies

While the usual suspects at the top of the American higher-education totem pole — Harvard, Yale, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford, Columbia, to name a few — can claim more than their fair share of internationally powerful alumni, state institutions some lesser-known schools also have taken advantage of the trend.

The University of Wisconsin, for example, counts among its alumni officials from Bangladesh, Jordan, Peru, Sri Lanka .

Louisiana State University boasts alumni who went on to prominent positions in Costa Rica, Honduras other nations come through its doors.

The University of Chicago trained the now-famous “Chicago Boys,” a group a Chilean economists who went on to greatly influence that country’s monetary policy.

“It’s not only the Harvards, but sometimes state colleges in unknown places are recruiting a lot of these international students. The global market Public Affairs. “Some of these colleges have done very well in recruiting these students from overseas. They’ve done very, very good work.”

The State Department the University of Colorado School of Mines (energy minister).

The federal government’s Fulbright Program, analysts say, deserves significant credit for the influx of foreign students — both future leaders offers grants to foreigners to attend U.S. institutions, assuming that they have the necessary grades to do so.

Rising numbers

In the 2010-11 school year, the number of foreign students in U.S. schools shot up to 723,277, an increase of 5 percent from the previous year, Institute of International Education has risen 32 percent over the past decade.

The institute’s data warm relationships with the U.S.

Chinese students accounted for much of the recent growth, with the total number from the burgeoning Asian power increasing by 23 percent overall by 43 percent at the undergraduate level.

In the 2010-11 school year Afghanistan, among others — also have sent their young people to the U.S.

Few countries, specialists say, bar students from attending top-notch American schools for political reasons, recognizing that the skills they gain in U.S. classrooms will be invaluable when they return home.

“I can’t see any regimes, other than maybe North Korea or Cuba, where there are limitations for people to go out the U.S., Mr. Balan said. “Very few times, [the animosity] becomes an insurmountable barrier to people who want to come study in the U.S.”

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